Regulations

General Ventilation

BS EN 15780:2011 Ventilation for buildings

Ductwork-Cleanliness of ventilation systems

The British Standard for cleanliness of ventilation systems (BS EN15780 2011) was published and approved by CEN (Comité Européen de Normalisation ) in November 2011. It applies to both new and existing ventilation and air conditioning systems and specifies the assessment criteria of cleanliness,cleaning procedures of these systems, and the validation of the effectiveness of cleaning applies also to products, which conform to EN 1505,EN 1506, EN 13053, EN 13180 and EN 13403, used in air conditioning and ventilation systems for human occupancy defined in the scope of CEN/TC 156. This European Standard does not apply to installations for industrial processes.

CEN members are bound to comply with the CEN/CENELEC Internal Regulations which stipulate the conditions for giving this European Standard the status of a national standard without any alteration. National standards shall be withdrawn at the latest by April 2012. Compliance with a British Standard does not confer immunity from your legal obligations.

Cleanliness of ventilation systems is considered important for human comfort and health, energy consumption, system service life and for cleanliness of operations or processes carried out in the ventilated area.

This European Standard specifies general requirements and procedures necessary in assessing and maintaining the cleanliness of ducted ventilation, including the following;

The main target groups of this European Standard are specifiers of the cleanliness quality classes and cleaning methods primarily system designers who also specify the system of access, building owners, services companies, maintenance companies, end users and consultancy and control companies.

  • Cleanliness quality classification;
  • How to assess the need for cleaning (visual, measurements);
  • Assessment frequency (general guidance); guidance of system inspections in accordance with EN 15239, and EN 15240 when relevant;
  • Selection of cleaning method – to be in line with handing over documentation according to EN 12599;
  • How to assess the result of cleaning.
  • This European Standard is a parallel standard to EN 12097, which specifies requirements for dimension, shape and location for access panels for cleaning and service in ductwork systems.

Cleanliness Quality Classes

A.2 Application in general

Levels of cleanliness for each quality class should be generally applied as demonstrated.

(Typical applications of cleanliness quality classes).

In most cases inspection frequency should be specified rather than cleaning frequency since changing and unknown conditions may alter the actual required cleaning frequency. Inspection should be regular, cleaning subject to inspection.

Low

Rooms with only intermettent occupancy e.g. storage rooms, technical rooms.

Medium

Offices, hotels, restaurants, schools, theatres, residential homes, shopping areas, exhibition buildings, sport buildings, general areas in hospitals and general working areas in industries.

High

Laboratories, treatment areas in hospitals, High quality offices.

Table A.2

Recommended inspection intervals according to cleanliness quality class, in months

AHU Filters Humidifiers Ducts Terminals
Low 24 12 12 48 48
Medium 12 12 6 24 24
High 12 6 6 12 12

Air handling units equipped with humidification or adiabatic cooling systems, or located in mild and wet weather conditions should be assessed at least twice a year, whatever the use of the building.

  • Filters should be inspected and maintained according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, with these intervals as the minimum ones.

To comply with the cleanliness quality classification samples should show results below the limit values given in

Table A.3

Acceptable cleanliness levels

Cleanliness Quality Class Acceptable Cleanliness Level Supply Ductwork Acceptable Cleanliness
Level Recirculation or
Secondary Air Ductwork
Low <4.5 g/m² <6.0 g/m²
Medium <3.0 g/m² 4.5 g/m²
High <0.6 g/m² <3.0 g/m²

Health and Safety Executive

The Work Place (Health, Safety and Welfare)

System Quality Class Acceptable Contamination Levels Supply Ductwork Acceptable Cleanliness Level Recirculation or Secondary Air Ductwork Acceptable Contamination Levels Extract Ductwork
DTT PVT DTT PVT DTT PVT
Low 90µm <4.5 g/m² 120µm <6.0 g/m² 180µm <9.0 g/m²
Medium 60µm <3.0 g/m² 90µm <4.5 g/m² 180µm <9.0 g/m²
High 12µm <0.6 g/m² 60µm <3.0 g/m² 180µm <9.0 g/m²

Regulation 1992, Regulation 5

“Requires that mechanical ventilation systems used for providing general ventilation are maintained including cleaned as appropriate, in an efficient state, in efficient working order and in good repair.”

Regulation 6 Section 33

“Mechanical Ventilation Systems (including air conditioning systems) should be regularly and properly cleaned, tested and maintained to ensure that they are kept clean and free from anything which may contaminate the air.”

Efficient in the above context means efficient from the view of health, safety and welfare (not productivity or economy).

Kitchen Extracts : Food Premises

Kitchen Extract Cleaning: The Regulatory (Fire Safety) Order 2005

From April 2006 it became an offence if systems were not maintained from a fire risk prospective and in the event of personal injury or death from a fire associated with a poorly maintained system (section 17 of the RRO) charges of corporate liability or manslaughter may be brought against the operator (responsible person). For compliance with this regulation, the Health and Safety Executive, Environmental Health Officers and Fire Inspectors would look for a maintenance routine that includes regular inspection of all ventilation systems to enclosed spaces.

They will expect to see logs of the results of these inspections. Inspection frequency will vary accordingly to the age and type of system, location and use. Any assumptions and conclusions made should be documented and filed.

The need for cleaning will be determined by the initial inspection, risk assessments and frequency by the ongoing inspections. The definition of ‘clean’ may be taken as visually clean depending on the individual circumstances.

Who is the responsible person(s)?

  • Employer with control of a workplace.

Failing that or in addition;

  • Person with overall management of a building;
  • Occupier of premises, Owner of premises (i.e. empty buildings);
  • Landlords (multi occupied buildings).

BSRIA’s RC44 which gives more detail and guidance for the Reform Order.

The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, lays down that :

“Employers and Persons concerned with premises owe the common duty of care both to employees and others who may use or visit the premises.”

Section 2 (2) (e)

“Requires that you as an employer, provide and maintain a working environment that is, so far as is reasonably practicable, safe and without risk to health.”

For compliance with this regulation Health and Safety Executive Inspectors will look for a maintenance routine that includes regular inspection of all ventilation systems to enclosed spaces.

They will expect to see logs of the results of these inspections. Inspection frequency will vary accordingly to age and type of system: location and use, the results of the initial survey. Any assumptions and conclusions made should be documented and filed. The need for cleaning will be determined by the initial inspection and frequency by the on-going inspections. The definition of ‘Clean’ may be taken as visually clean depending on individual circumstances.

Guidance on surface grease deposits limits

Building and Engineering Services – Guide to good practice : Internal Cleanliness of Ventilation System TR19

7.42 Table 12

Wet Film Thickness Measurement Recommended Action
200 µm as a mean across the system Complete Cleaning Required
Any single Measurement above 500 µm Urgent Localised Cleaning Required
7.34 Post Clean Verification

Following cleaning all post wet film thickness tests shall not exceed 50 µm and shall be representative of the system.

Regulation (EC) No. 852/2004
Annex II Chapter I

EC 852/2004 legislation covers all stages of the production, processing, distribution and placing on the market of food intended for human consumption. ‘Placing on the market’ means the holding of food for the purpose of sale.

The new hygiene rules were adopted in April 2004 by the European Parliament and the Council. They became applicable on 1 January 2006. The Food Standards Agency has confirmed that under European treaty this forms part of British law.

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